Sunday Scriptures — OT A 05, Feb. 05, 2017

Again, this post is late, but better than never I hope. This time I have a pretty good excuse I think: I was away at St. Anselm Abbey in New Hampshire for several days, beginning on Sunday. I’m planning to post about that also when I have time.

We continue to hear readings from the Sermon on the Mount and passages illustrating it. In the gospel passage — Matthew 5:13-16 — Jesus calls his disciples, including us, the salt of the earth and the light of the world. Before exploring those characterizations, let’s note that he doesn’t say we will be salt and light to the world, but that we already are salt and light. For us, it is our baptism which gives us these qualities, which are actually our vocation. Salt enhances the flavor of things and it also preserves them. As Christians, our lives should make the world more pleasant and should inhibit decay and corruption. Light is what enables people to see what exists. We should enable people to see the reality which surrounds them — the truth about the world — even enabling them to see the reality of God, who underlies our existence and actions. Jesus realizes that we can abandon our call to be salt and light and exhorts us not to.

In the first reading —Isaiah 58:7-10 — we hear how we can be light. It is by performing works of mercy, several of which are also commanded by Jesus in his parable of the Judgment of the Nations (Matthew 25:31-46). When we do so, we continue bringing the “great light” which, according the the first reading of two weeks ago, the people who walked in darkness saw with the coming of Jesus. As Jesus says in the gospel, our good works are done so that those who see them will give glory to God. The responsorial psalm — verses of Ps 112 — reinforces the message that good deeds bring light, in this case, for their practitioner.

Finally, the second reading — 1 Corinthians 2:1-5 — tells us that we don’t have to be eloquent like Bishop Sheen or Bishop Barron, we don’t have to be heroic like Mother Teresa. Just as Paul evangelized in weakness, so can we, because our success as salt and light isn’t ultimately dependent on our skill “but on the power of God.” What is required on our part is simply that we not shirk.

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